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February 18, 2021

 

So you decided to grow yourself an epic beard. Congrats!

As you store the razor away for a few months, you picture yourself looking ruggedly handsome like Jason Momoa or Idris Elba, right? But then a few weeks later, your face is covered in coarse, straggly tufts interspersed with… bare patches!

Instead of seeing a superhero stud, that patchy beard reminds you of trying to grow facial hair when you were a teenager. What the …?!

Bro, don’t sweat it. For the vast majority of guys in the early stages of growth, a patchy beard is normal. It takes time for it to look the way you want. Hang in there!

But if you’re really concerned that you’ve lost your manly mojo, here’s 8 tips to help you out...

1. Get your mindset right BEFORE growing it out

If you’re just growing out your beard, cut yourself some slack, man. A good garden takes time to cultivate. You’re in this for the long haul. Beards develop and change a LOT over time, so be patient and keep letting it grow.

The first month is the time when any empty patches in your beard will be most obvious. After that month, the growth starts connecting. Give it at least two to three months to grow out thickly and properly, especially on the cheeks.

In the first few weeks, be prepared for some itchiness and maybe some looks/comments from others as they adjust to your new look. In due time it will be rugged and magnificent.

Deal with beard itch by washing it about as frequently as you wash your head hair and apply a beard moisturizer to keep the coarse new hairs soft.

2. Step away from the razor, my friend

Despite what you may have heard, shaving does not cause facial hair to grow back thicker and faster. Don’t shave it off!

If you’re thinking about shaving simply because you’re concerned about looking “weird” during the early growth stages, just pick a strategic time to start growing out. For instance, stop shaving while you’re on vacation or a few days before a long weekend, or while working from home.

3. Avoid unproven gimmicks

When we’re feeling down about our patchy beard, clever marketers sure know how to finesse us dudes by pushing weird products and promising quick results. No doubt you’ve already seen a million thing-a-mabobs that will supposedly turn you into the bearded King of the North - overnight! Phfft.

If it appears like a Hail Mary that’s too good to be true, it is.

Instead of turning to gimmicks that “make your beard grow faster”, put your focus on not inhibiting or slowing down natural growth.

We know, we know. You want it NOW - and nurturing natural growth sounds like it will take forrrrever! We get it.

However, nothing could be further from the truth, my man. Focusing on healthy growth could mean the difference between a lush beard, and a sparse one ...that just grows a little faster.

Some things that can slow natural growth are:

  • Poor diet
  • Stress
  • Low testosterone levels
  • An aggressive beard-grooming routine
  • Lack of a proper beard-care routine altogether
  • Poor skin health and/or skin diseases
  • Chemicals from shady products

4. Improve your lifestyle

First, reduce stress and get good quality sleep.

Then improve your nutritional intake (through diet and supplements) and exercise to boost your blood circulation and natural testosterone. You probably know that vitamin deficiencies can adversely affect the health of hair on top of your head, so it stands to reason it can affect the lushness of your facial hair. When it comes to supplements, a good rule is… if they say it promotes beard growth, it pretty much doesn’t. Don’t fall for the ploy. Simply use a good quality multi-vitamin.

5. Mr. Miyagi it up & do some judicious trimming

Like Mr. Miyagi and his bonsai trees (ahh, nostalgia), you might be surprised how fine-tuning a new patchy beard can help its appearance.

Shave around your beard to outline it and make it look more sculpted. Sharper, defined edges may help your new beard look less patchy and stand out from the bare skin above and below it.

Then, after it’s grown for a while, trim the hairs to be about the same length to help your beard appear less patchy and perhaps even denser.

6. Get a GOOD beard brush

Brushing can make a thin, patchy beard appear fuller than it really is. On top of that, it can exfoliate the skin, help circulation and spread the healthy, natural oils that collect at the shaft of your hair through to the rest of your beard. Plus, it feels so damn good!

But beware, there are many brushes that can do way more damage than good. Don’t waste your time (and money) on plastic or synthetic brushes. Just don’t do it. Always, always, always use a 100% Boars Hair Bristle Brush.

7. Oil your mane

A quality beard oil can make growing and maintaining a beard much easier. A good combo of natural oils, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals will penetrate deep into the skin and hair follicles to keep your skin and beard healthy, soft, smooth, and looking spectacular. It’s also going to combat beard itch, beardruff and beard acne.

Look for one that includes jojoba or argan oil and avoid brands that contain mineral oil, silicone, sulfate, phosphate, parabens, or colorants.

8. As it grows longer, try a beard balm

As they lengthen, tame those wild strands with a beard balm. Just like the hair on your head, a bit of shaping and sculpting with a balm will make your beard neater and sharper – and healthier.

Could your patchy beard be alopecia barbae?

It sounds like a cool product name, but it’s a rare autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease instructs your immune system to attack healthy cells. Alopecia barbae goes after beard hair follicles, causing facial hair loss, usually in circular patches near the jawline.

If you think you have alopecia barbae, only a dermatologist can diagnose it and suggest treatments. Don’t go down the internet diagnosis rabbit hole.

There you have it. Patchy beards are pretty common in the early stages of hair growth, but in almost all cases it will sort itself out. The advice in this blog should help, as will consulting with fellow beardsmen who can share their experience and pearls of wisdom.

Stay rugged, my friend.